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Moderated by: Weird Occurance Lord Denida

What are you into?

What sort of books do you all like reading? Do you have a favorite book or series?

Posted 1 Week ago by Weird Occurance

I, personally, cannot read non-fiction.

I think I like contemporary fantasy / fiction the most, but I don't know if I have a favorite book or series.

Wanted to put out feelers to see what you all are into :)

¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

There are 24 Replies


I, personally, cannot read non-fiction.


I'll get you into GEB if it's the last thing I do!





1 Week ago
Xhin
Sky's the limit

I'll get you into GEB if it's the last thing I do!


Good luck...!

You've certainly got your work cut out for you n this regard lol

¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

1 Week ago
Weird Occurance

Generally speaking, my favorite type of book is weird fiction (a term that I use to mean the overarching classification of sci-fi, fantasy, horror and whatever other novels contain bizarre elements that don't quite fit into any of those). In the recent years, I have gained an interest in ergodic literature and other progressive forms of weirdness. It's obvious that I enjoy philosophy as well, and the persistence of the American Right in calling me a "fucking commie" has led me to actually investigate Marxist theory in order to see if this is a suitable characterization.

Currently reading:

Umberto Eco - Semiotics and the Philosophy of Language; The Name of the Rose
Mark Z. Danielewski - House of Leaves
Albert Camus - Resistance, Rebellion, and Death
Frederick Engels - various
Neal Stephenson - Cryptonomicon

To read:

Michael Moorcock - The Eternal Champion
Stalin, Mao, Lenin, Marx - various
Camus - various (I have the complete Heritage collection of his works)
John Saeed - Semantics
Brent Weeks - Shadow's Edge (The Night Angel Trilogy, Book 2)
Various - whatever Cthulhu Mythos stories I can find conveniently
Various - a handful of one-volume world histories that I have lying about
Stephen R. Donaldson - The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever
Robert Anton Wilson - The Illuminatus Trilogy
Dan Simmons - The Rise of Endymion
Brian Catling - The Vorrh
Scott Hawkins - The Library at Mount Char

To re-read:

Neal Stephenson - Snow Crash
H.P. Lovecraft - complete Cthulhu Mythos

1 Week ago
galbraith

My jam is Science Fiction and fantasy, but there're other genres like dark humor, for example Darkly Dreaming Dexter.

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1 Week ago
Lord Denida

I need/want to respond, but I have other obligations.
Maybe I’ll quit procrastinating and do some of them.

I prefer hard SF, then soft SF, then logically-internally-consistent fantasy, then alternate history. I guess.

1 Week ago
chiarizio
 

I see the House of Leaves thing is still happening.

Me personally, I'm big into horror, mystery, suspense, thriller, but of those, horror is my favorite. I write horror fiction as a hobby as well, and I read and take great inspiration from Stephen King. He's been my favorite author since I was in middle school; before that, it was R.L. Stine with his Goosebumps and Fear Street books, which still rank among my favorites. I've read a bit of Dean Koontz as well, and Betty Ren Wright, and Bruce Coville, and a few others who write ghost stories for a living. That, and Agatha Christie for a good mystery. Other than that, I'll read a bit of science fiction here and there; my high school band director is a writer of science-fiction novels which discuss and defend the Christian faith, and they are incredible reads, all of them. His latest trilogy, of which the last book is still in progress, delves into a world he created, a world wherein music literally has the power to physically shape the world around you.

1 Week ago
Black Yoshi

A little bit of everything and almost anything.

For actual narrative reading I tend to prefer high fantasy; I'm not above low fantasy or fantastic SF or even a good adventure tale. I've started a seasonal reread of Harry Potter.

I engage in a lot of "browse reading" as a matter of worldbuilding research. So books may range from the Universal Self Instructor or Kelly's Handbook or a hundred year old Sears Catalog or an old home recipe book, atlases, prayer books, grammars of old languages, most recently Aramaic, the Organon of Medicine, Things Not Generally Known, the Complete Hoyle, Encyclopedia of Classified Dates, Keightly's Fairy Mythology, Mao's Red Book, some horrible thing by Marx.

Recently I've been working on the Nature of Middle Earth, the Initiatory Path in Fairy Tales and Burpee's Farm Annual for 1888. Also I've been working on a Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armor and the Cambridge Star Atlas.

1 Week ago
elemtilas
 

my high school band director is a writer of science-fiction novels which discuss and defend the Christian faith, and they are incredible reads,


I was going to remark about the probability of apologia making for decent narrative, but then I remember that I quite enjoy the Sword of Truth series (and only partially ironically), so I suppose that it doesn't really matter.

1 Week ago
galbraith

I also like lots of nonfiction.
My favorites are mostly mathematical, or computing, or linguistic, or other scientific, or historical.

….

To pick out a series I’d guess the “Counterexamples In …” series, probably.

Also “… for Dummies” and “Complete Idiots’ Guide to …”

1 Week ago
chiarizio
 

Generally speaking, my favorite type of book is weird fiction (a term that I use to mean the overarching classification of sci-fi, fantasy, horror and whatever other novels contain bizarre elements that don't quite fit into any of those)


Sounds like my taste in movies. I don't read nearly enough, but with movies, I like ones that don't fit cleanly into a single genre, or stand out in some way.

It's obvious that I enjoy philosophy as well, and the persistence of the American Right in calling me a "fucking commie" has led me to actually investigate Marxist theory in order to see if this is a suitable characterization.


I like philosophy a lot.
Marx writes incredibly well... he's super easy to understand and his manifesto is a quick read, but I don't agree with his philosophy. lol

H.P. Lovecraft - complete Cthulhu Mythos


Lovecraft has been on my to-read list forever. I just never seem to get around to it.
I hear Lovecraft is kind of hit or miss.

I prefer hard SF, then soft SF, then logically-internally-consistent fantasy, then alternate history. I guess.


Oooh - examples required.

Me personally, I'm big into horror, mystery, suspense, thriller, but of those, horror is my favorite. I write horror fiction as a hobby as well, and I read and take great inspiration from Stephen King.


Horror is my favorite genre for movies... right up there with psychological thrillers.
Stephen King's writing is better than the movie adaptations of his stuff haha
I'd love to see some of your horror fiction.

He's been my favorite author since I was in middle school; before that, it was R.L. Stine with his Goosebumps and Fear Street books, which still rank among my favorites.


R.L. Stine is great. I've heard he writes adult horror, too, but I haven't read any of it.

I've read a bit of Dean Koontz as well, and Betty Ren Wright, and Bruce Coville, and a few others who write ghost stories for a living.


Of these, Dean Koontz is the only one I've heard of.
My best friend and one of my aunts are super into ghost story stuff.

That, and Agatha Christie for a good mystery.


Agatha Christie's been on my to-read list, too. I should get around to this.

'll read a bit of science fiction here and there; my high school band director is a writer of science-fiction novels which discuss and defend the Christian faith, and they are incredible reads, all of them. His latest trilogy, of which the last book is still in progress, delves into a world he created, a world wherein music literally has the power to physically shape the world around you.


This sounds particularly neat.

For actual narrative reading I tend to prefer high fantasy; I'm not above low fantasy or fantastic SF or even a good adventure tale. I've started a seasonal reread of Harry Potter.


Funny. I see high fantasy as pretty different from low fantasy in terms of narrative style, so some people rule out one based on their like of the other.
I don't often like the narrative style of high fantasy. I can't really get immersed in it.

Enjoy the reread!

I engage in a lot of "browse reading" as a matter of worldbuilding research.


I've been meaning to ask you and Chiarizio - are you into worldbuilding for fun as a standalone or do you like to write stories with the ideas you come up with?

¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

1 Week ago
Weird Occurance

Marx writes incredibly well... he's super easy to understand and his manifesto is a quick read, but I don't agree with his philosophy. lol


I do not have a copy of the Communist Manifesto, and it has not been particularly recommended to me. From what I understand, it has limited value in developing a sophisticated grasp of the theory, as it is more a pamphlet than a book, and was written over a few weeks in response to the demands of the impending revolutions.

I do have, as was recommended to me, Wage-Labour and Capital and Value, Price and Profit in a single volume, being moderately more substantial than the Manifesto. It will be the next thing that I tackle along the Marxist thread, after I am comfortably apprised of Engels.

1 Week ago
galbraith

I find Marx soporific.

1 Week ago
chiarizio
 

I've been meaning to ask you and Chiarizio - are you into worldbuilding for fun as a standalone or do you like to write stories with the ideas you come up with?


=¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤


Hmg. While I find it enjoyable, I wouldn't say I do it "for fun". It's something that simply has to be done. It's like with music - it has to be written out. So it is with a world. It has to be experienced and described.

I do, and have, written a number of stories set in my world. I also write books about the world itself, from the in-world perspective.

3 Days ago
elemtilas
 

It's like with music - it has to be written out.


Does it?

3 Days ago
galbraith

While I find it enjoyable, I wouldn't say I do it "for fun". It's something that simply has to be done. It's like with music - it has to be written out. So it is with a world. It has to be experienced and described.


Oh, like a creative catharsis?

I do, and have, written a number of stories set in my world. I also write books about the world itself, from the in-world perspective.


Very cool. I guess a better way of wording my first question would've been to ask if you use the world you're constructing in stories or anything else, or if you just worldbuild because it's a creative endeavor in and of itself. Thank you for answering. :)

¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

2 Days ago
Weird Occurance

I worldbuild for fun. I didn’t originally intend to just build the world.
I try to write stories in my builtworlds but I never like the way they read.
I have story-ideas and game-ideas, and I can get really excited about them up to the point of actually creating them.

2 Days ago
chiarizio
 

I try to write stories in my builtworlds but I never like the way they read.


I'd like to see some of these if you're ever comfortable sharing!

I have story-ideas and game-ideas, and I can get really excited about them up to the point of actually creating them.


Because you don't like the execution when you actually start?

¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

2 Days ago
Weird Occurance

Does it?


Yes!

2 Days ago
elemtilas
 

Oh, like a creative catharsis?


No, I don't think so. It's just in there and it has to be written out.

I just wish I could write out the music I hear.


Very cool. I guess a better way of wording my first question would've been to ask if you use the world you're constructing in stories or anything else, or if you just worldbuild because it's a creative endeavor in and of itself. Thank you for answering. :)


Well, yes, it is a creative endeavour, and I'd still work on the world even I didn't write stories.

But to clarify, yes I do write stories set in this world!

Writing stories isn't the primary impetus for worldbuilding, and I dare say much of the worldbuilding will never make it into a story. Happily, I've also written books about the world, which are made as in-world artifacts. Kind of double-dip worldbuilding, because I have to have enough material to make the book and then have to write the book from a native perspective!


=¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤



[[ chiarizio ]]

chiarizio, I'd like to see some of your stories too, if you'd like to share!

2 Days ago
elemtilas
 

But to clarify, yes I do write stories set in this world!


Writing stories isn't the primary impetus for worldbuilding, and I dare say much of the worldbuilding will never make it into a story. Happily, I've also written books about the world, which are made as in-world artifacts. Kind of double-dip worldbuilding, because I have to have enough material to make the book and then have to write the book from a native perspective!


So I used to write a good deal and found worldbuilding difficult and tedious; I'd only ever come up with what I needed in the moment for a story hahah I guess it takes all sorts of people!

I wish I had a knack for coming up with deep cultures, religions, and information that I won't ever need, but would be cool to explore, ponder, and create.

Kudos to you and Chiarizio for having this skill!

I'd love to see stories either of you create!



¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

1 Day ago
Weird Occurance

So I used to write a good deal and found worldbuilding difficult and tedious; I'd only ever come up with what I needed in the moment for a story hahah I guess it takes all sorts of people!




I wish I had a knack for coming up with deep cultures, religions, and information that I won't ever need, but would be cool to explore, ponder, and create.




It does indeed take all kinds! Mind you, for me it's as much a matter of time as it is of knack. I'm the sort who's only ever worked in one universe, so over the course of I think about 40 years, I have managed to amass a pretty good amount of information!

1 Day ago
elemtilas
 

It does indeed take all kinds! Mind you, for me it's as much a matter of time as it is of knack. I'm the sort who's only ever worked in one universe, so over the course of I think about 40 years, I have managed to amass a pretty good amount of information!


Do you find certain elements of worldbuilding more fun than others?

Like are ideas of religion, rites/rituals/customs, laws, social structure, and livelihood all equal or do you find a certain element more fun/interesting to explore?

¤¤♅êîrÐ Øccu®@n瀤¤

1 Day ago
Weird Occurance

So I used to write a good deal and found worldbuilding difficult and tedious; I'd only ever come up with what I needed in the moment for a story hahah I guess it takes all sorts of people!




I wish I had a knack for coming up with deep cultures, religions, and information that I won't ever need, but would be cool to explore, ponder, and create.




It does indeed take all kinds! Mind you, for me it's as much a matter of time as it is of knack. I'm the sort who's only ever worked in one universe, so over the course of I think about 40 years, I have managed to amass a pretty good amount of information!

1 Day ago
elemtilas
 

Do you find certain elements of worldbuilding more fun than others?



Yeah. I've always found the "little things", the tiny details that probably wouldn't even make it into a nursery rhyme, let alone a folktale, to be quite fun.


There is, for example, a tiny creature called the inverse earthworm. It's only an inch or so long and lives so deep in the earth that only the deep chthonic miners have come across it. For it reviles the Sun and gnaws ever deeper into the rock of the planet. It's probably been a hundred million years or more since anyone saw its distant ancestors anywhere near the surface.


Like are ideas of religion, rites/rituals/customs, laws, social structure, and livelihood all equal or do you find a certain element more fun/interesting to explore?



All of these are terribly fun to explore! I've done quite a bit of work on several different religions, have written out some scriptures and even assayed a sort of "scholarly" study of one particular set of related scriptures.


The law is always fun. I've worked out what a capital trial looks like in the big empire of Auntimoany, and what the results look like. Pretty nasty affairs.


Here are a couple examples of laws from the little country of Angera, just to the west of Auntimoany:



  • Woe betide the man that harm himself, lest further harm befall him! For His High Majesty has said this: i. the penalty for such a man as the one who has been the cause of a self mutilation by the left hand is for the other hand to be removed in a manner liable to cause much grinding of bones and great howls of pain. ii. however, the penalty for such a man as the one who has been the cause of a self mutilation by the right hand is for the other hand to be immersed in oil which shall be heated until that hand is right crispy, and then it shall be severed, and then the man shall be compelled to devour his own left hand.



  • Ye Doctors of Physick All do quake who do harm to any Man, lest harm be done to thee! For His High Majesty has said this: i. When a Doctor of Physic shall kill his patient while his patient shall be in his care, the Doctor which killed the patient shall have the joints of his hands impaled with fine spikes. ii. When a Doctor of Physic shall kill a man his wife, the Doctor shall excuse himself and at least feign sorrow.



  • Woe betide the man that consumes the flesh of Man, lest he bring upon him this doom! For His High Majesty has said this: Whenever a man shall consume the flesh of Man, let him with haste invite his kin to the Feast! For in as much as he enjoys the taste of the flesh of Man, let them all join him at table; then set before him the State pewter & bronze, and bring forth refreshing drinks in brass ewers; and lo, it shall be made so that he shall consume his own flesh, morsel by morsel, from the soles of his feet and upwards, taking no rest nor respite from the labour! And when the Lady Death consume him at last, let his kinfolk finish his meal in his place!


    Rituals are fun, too! There is an ancient practice among the Pagan Werres of Auntimoany called the Sun Chair. It's your bog standard spring equinox sacrifice a likely lad and lift his still beating heart up to the New Sun kind of thing. It's been suppressed for centuries as being just a little too folkloric in nature.


    Recently, however, the Empress lifted all sanctions against the ancient practice, and so the Pagans have welcomed her edict with open arms and sharpened knives. Only this time, they prefer to abduct one of the local Denê, one of the winged races, rather than waste Werreish blood. The chair and the blood are the same, but anymore it's turned into a bit of a neighbourhood barbecue, with the victim as the guest of honour. State sanctioned allophagy. It's as the lawyers say: What crime? It's not cannibalism if dinner's got wings!

  • 1 Day ago
    elemtilas
     

    Reply to: What sort of books do you all like reading? Do you have a favorite book or series?

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